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Vitamin for stress

Vitamin for stress - The following vitamins and minerals are crucial for stress control: Vitamin for stress - B1 thiamine
Thiamine (vitamin B-1) helps the body cells convert carbohydrates into energy. It is also essential for the functioning of the heart, muscles, and nervous system.

Thiamine is found in fortified breads, cereals, pasta, whole grains (especially wheat germ), lean meats (especially pork), fish, dried beans, peas, and soybeans.

Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables are not very high in thiamine, but when consumed in large amounts, they become a significant source.

Vitamin for stress - B2 riboflavin
Riboflavin (vitamin B-2) works with the other B vitamins. It is important for body growth and red blood cell production and helps in releasing energy from carbohydrates.

Lean meats, eggs, legumes, nuts, green leafy vegetables, dairy products, and milk provide riboflavin in the diet. Breads and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin.

Because riboflavin is destroyed by exposure to light, foods with riboflavin should not be stored in glass containers that are exposed to light.

Vitamin for stress - B3 niacin
Niacin assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin, and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy.

Niacin (also known as vitamin B-3) is found in dairy products, poultry, fish, lean meats, nuts, and eggs. Legumes and enriched breads and cereals also supply some niacin.

Vitamin for stress - B5 pantothenic acid
Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food. It is essential in the synthesis of hormones and cholesterol. Cholesterol is needed by the body for the proper functioning of its cells' membranes, particularly in the brain.

Pantothenic acid and biotin are found in foods that are good sources of B vitamins, including Eggs, Fish, Milk and milk products, Whole-grain cereals, Legumes, Yeast, Broccoli and other vegetables in the cabbage family, White and sweet potatoes, Lean beef.

Vitamin for stress - B6 pyridoxine
Vitamin B-6 plays a role in the synthesis of antibodies by the immune system. Antibodies are needed to fight many diseases. Vitamin B-6 helps maintain normal nerve function and also acts in the formation of red blood cells. It is also required for the chemical reactions needed to digest proteins. The higher the protein intake, the more the need for vitamin B-6.

Vitamin B-6 is found in beans, nuts, legumes, eggs, meats, fish, whole grains, and fortified breads and cereals.

Vitamin for stress - Vitamin C
Vitamin C is required for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body. It is necessary to form collagen, an important protein used to make skin, scar tissue, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. Vitamin C is essential for the healing of wounds, and for the repair and maintenance of cartilage, bones, and teeth.

Vitamin C is one of many antioxidants. Vitamin E and beta-carotene are two other well-known antioxidants. Antioxidants are nutrients that block some of the damage caused by free radicals, which are by-products that result when our bodies transform food into energy.

The build up of these by-products over time is largely responsible for the aging process and can contribute to the development of various health conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and a host of inflammatory conditions like arthritis. Antioxidants also help reduce the damage to the body caused by toxic chemicals and pollutants such as cigarette smoke.

Vitamin C deficiency can lead to dry and splitting hair; gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and bleeding gums; rough, dry, scaly skin; decreased wound-healing rate, easy bruising; nosebleeds; weakened enamel of the teeth; swollen and painful joints; anemia; decreased ability to ward off infection; and, possibly, weight gain because of slowed metabolic rate and energy expenditure. A severe form of vitamin C deficiency is known as scurvy, which mainly affects older, malnourished adults.

The body does not manufacture vitamin C on its own, nor does it store it. It is therefore important to include plenty of vitamin C-containing foods in your daily diet.

All fruits and vegetables contain some amount of vitamin C. Foods that tend to be the highest sources of vitamin C include green peppers, citrus fruits and juices, strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, turnip greens and other leafy greens, sweet and white potatoes, and cantaloupe.

Other excellent sources include papaya, mango, watermelon, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, winter squash, red peppers, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, and pineapples.

Selenium
Selenium has a variety of functions. The main one is its role as an antioxidant in the enzyme selenium-glutathione-peroxidase. This enzyme neutralizes hydrogen peroxide, which is produced by some cell processes and would otherwise damage cell membranes.

Selenium also seems to stimulate antibody formation in response to vaccines. It also may provide protection from the toxic effects of heavy metals and other substances.

Selenium may assist in the synthesis of protein, in growth and development, and in fertility, especially in men. It has been shown to improve the production of sperm and sperm motility.

Fish, shellfish, red meat, grains, eggs, chicken, liver, and garlic are all good sources of selenium. The amount of selenium in vegetables is dependent on the selenium content of the soil. Brewer's yeast and wheat germ, both considered "health foods," are also good sources of selenium.

Zinc
Zinc plays an important role in the proper functioning of the immune system in the body. It is required for the enzyme activities necessary for cell division, cell growth, and wound healing. It plays a role in the acuity of the senses of smell and taste. Zinc is also involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates.

High-protein foods contain high amounts of zinc. Beef, pork, and lamb contain more zinc than fish. The dark meat of a chicken has more zinc than the light meat.

Other good sources of zinc are peanuts, peanut butter, and legumes.

Fruits and vegetables are not good sources, because zinc in plant proteins is not as available for use by the body as the zinc from animal proteins. Therefore, low-protein diets and vegetarian diets tend to be low in zinc.

Vitamin for stress - Omega 3 fatty acids (fish oils)
Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. The body cannot make these fatty acids on its own so omega-3s must be obtained from food. These different types of acids can be obtained in foods such as cold-water fish including tuna, salmon, and mackerel. Other important omega 3 fatty acids are found in dark green leafy vegetables, flaxseed oils, and certain vegetable oils.Omega-3 fatty acids have been found to be beneficial for the heart. Positive effects include anti-inflammatory and anti-blood clotting actions, lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and reducing blood pressure. These fatty acids may also reduce the risks and symptoms for other disorders including diabetes, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, some cancers, and mental decline.

Advantages of taking vitamin for stress

Although Vitamin for stress may cost slightly more than natural food, you are able to measure the amount of your intake with certainty, not to mention the fact that supplements presents a quick and convenient way of getting your required nutrition.

If you decide to take supplements and vitamin for stress, it is important that you continue to take it consistently and that you will have to wait for a month or so before the results can be felt. These supplements and Vitamin for stress work gently and surely with your body to build up its resistance against stress, unlike prescription Stress medication, which might work quickly but may be too harsh for your body.

Get quality supplements and Vitamin for stress here.








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